Sunday, August 9, 2020

Tropidoleptus carinatus brachiopod from the Sellersburg Limestone

Today's specimen is Tropidoleptus carinatus from the Sellersburg limestone of Indiana. The Sellersburg limestone is middle Devonian in age (Givetian stage) and lies above the Jeffersonville formation.  The fossils below are from two different individuals but show both valves of T. carinatus. I purchased these specimens from a seller on E-bay some years ago.

Brachial valve dorsal surface

Brachial valve ventral surface

View of the rear of the brachial valve with the attachment points for the brachioles shown

Pedicle valve dorsal surface

Pedicle valve ventral surface


Left side profile of pedicle valve

Posterior of pedicle valve

Anterior of pedicle valve

T. carinatus is very common in the middle to upper Devonian aged rocks of North America. Some of the best specimens I have found come from the Kashong shale member of the Moscow formation in New York.  I have never found examples of the species with individual valves before though, so these are special specimens in my collection.

These specimens come from the Sellersburg Limestone located in Clark County, IN which is near Louisville, KY and is dated to the Devonian period (Givetian stage).

Friday, August 7, 2020

Schlotheimophyllum sp. coral from the Lousiville Limestone

I had some help with the ID of these next two specimens. They are both the coral Schlotheimophyllum sp.  from the Louisville limestone near Louisville, Kentucky.  The first specimen came to me from Mike P. who runs the excellent "Louisville Fossils and Beyond" blog.

Specimen #1 - top view of calice

Angled view of the calice

Side views of the corallum with each subsequent picture showing the side rotated 90 degrees from the prior picture.




Bottom of the corallum

The second specimen shown below I found myself in the field near Louisville, KY.  I wanted to make sure it was the same genera as the above specimen from Mike P. so I referred to the book by Erwin Charles Stumm; "Silurian and Devonian Corals of the Falls of the Ohio". to help ID and found a possible match on page 25, plate 25, fig. 1-8. Stumm has several species listed but they all have a somewhat flat to funnel shaped calice with thick septa. The specimen below appears similar to that description and to the specimen above, so I am comfortable labeling it as Schlotheimophyllum sp. as well.

Specimen #2 - view of the top of the calice

Angled view of the calcie (I don't know what the foreign attachment is as there is little detail preserved. Perhaps a brachiopod or another coral established itself prior to buiral?)

Side views of the corallum with each subsequent picture showing the side rotated 90 degrees from the prior picture.




A view of the bottom of the corallum

These specimens come from the Lousiville Limestone near Louisville, KY and are dated to the Silurian period (Homerian to Gorstian stage).

References: Stumm, E. C. (1964). Silurian and Devonian corals of the falls of the Ohio. New York: Geological Society of America.

Wednesday, August 5, 2020

Tryplasma prava from the Lousiville Limestone

This next coral comes from the Lousiville Limestone near Louisville, KY. It was found at a site of mixed eroded material from both the aforementioned formation and the Jeffersonville Limestone. It's a small coral with a distinct looking calice that is flat near the edge but very straight and deep.

I used the book by Erwin Charles Stumm; "Silurian and Devonian Corals of the Falls of the Ohio". to help ID and found a possible match with Tryplasma prava on page 51, plate 6, fig. 1, 3, 7-8.  In his description Stumm says "Exterior typically very closely annulated with superposed former (calice) margins 0.5-3mm apart." and "(Calice) walls steeply sloping to vertical with shallowly inwardly sloping margin in some specimens."

Those descriptions match this specimen very well as it does have what appear to be multiple calice growths (perhaps a sign of rejuvenation or just the growth habit of the coral) as well as having steep walls in the calice itself.

This and the next two pictures are the sides of the specimen as seen rotated 120 degrees from the prior picture.



A view of the calice at an angle to show the steep walls.

Top view of the calice showing how the walls are straight to slightly sloping inward.


I believe this specimen comes from the Lousiville Limestone near Louisville, KY and is dated to the Silurian period (Homerian to Gorstian stage).

References: Stumm, E. C. (1964). Silurian and Devonian corals of the falls of the Ohio. New York: Geological Society of America.

Monday, August 3, 2020

Strombodes shumari coral from the Louisville Limestone

Below are two specimens that look similar but have some differences which could mean they are not the same species. I am working from partial pieces of larger corals so the best I have been able to ID these specimens is that they are Strombodes shumari from the Louisville Limestone.  I found them at a site near Louisville, KY a number of years ago and only got around to identifying them now.  I used the book by Erwin Charles Stumm; "Silurian and Devonian Corals of the Falls of the Ohio". to help ID and found a possible match on page 47, plate 22, fig. 1-8.

The preservation of the specimens is incomplete and so I can't find all the diagnostic details to truly confirm the ID. What makes me think I may be correct that these are Strombodes shumari is the pattern of rejuvenation of the calice. This is seen in the specimens as a reduction of the calice diameter via continuous growth over a short horizontal and vertical distance, only to renew vertical growth. The repeated growth pattern is the key to identify this species.

Specimen #1 - This and the next three pictures are the sides of the specimen as seen rotated 90 degrees from the prior picture.




Specimen #1 - A closer view of the calice where the rejuvenation surface is shown.

Specimen #2 - This and the next photo are of the side of the specimen and then turned 90 degrees. Note that this specimen only has one cycle of regrowth and has evidence of a more significant calcie size difference than the prior specimen. Perhaps this is a different genus or species, or perhaps similar evidence was not preserved as well in the prior specimen?


Specimen #2 - A closer view of the calice where the rejuvenation surface is shown.

A view of the partially preserved cross section of the calice.


I believe these specimens come from the Lousiville Limestone near Louisville, KY and are dated to the Silurian period (Homerian to Gorstian stage).

References: Stumm, E. C. (1964). Silurian and Devonian corals of the falls of the Ohio. New York: Geological Society of America.

Saturday, August 1, 2020

Alveolites goldfussi from the Jeffersonville Limestone

This hand sized specimens looks to me to be a good example of Alveolites goldfussi.  It comes from a site near Louisville, KY that exposed Silurian and Devonian aged rocks from the Louisville Limestone (Silurian), Jeffersonville Limestone (Devonian), as well as other possible formations.  In my opinion this specimen is a good match for Alveolites goldfussi and looks similar to specimens I have found in the Hungry Hollow member of the Widder formation near Arkona, Canada.  It is a somewhat flat specimen with some relief and layering evident. The corralites are flat lying and resemble fish scales somewhat. A. goldfussi was an encrusting coral that would form flat shelf like colonies.

Top view of specimen

Top view of specimen rotated 90 degrees

Closer view of the top surface

A view from the side where you can see the layering and corallite openings.

Underside view of the specimen.

I believe this specimen comes from the Jeffersonville Limestone near Louisville, KY and is dated to the Devonian period (Eifelian).

References: Stumm, E. C. (1964). Silurian and Devonian corals of the falls of the Ohio. New York: Geological Society of America.