Thursday, May 14, 2015

I'm not fossilized yet, just resting.

It's been a while since I've updated the blog but I'm slowly getting a queue built up in the background. My day job as an Project Engineer for a Telecommunications company is taking up some extra time these days. Plus now that the warm weather is back I've been doing some collecting. I've plenty of material to post in the next few months: some new Moroccan Trilobites (and Brachs and Goniatites) that I've recently added to my collection and a large number of fossils from the Lockhovian aged Helderberg fauna of the Kalkberg formation of NY (at least 18 new brachiopod species alone!). Once I have a sufficient number of posts written I'll start putting them up again.

To tide you over until then here are a couple of pieces of  limestone from the Onondaga formation of NY (Devonian, Eifelian stage). I picked it up from a roadcut  along I-90 east of Batavia. The limestone is very hard and fossils don't seem to weather loose from it but the broken pieces reveal cross sections of corals. I kept the two pieces below because the sections are interesting to look at and are good examples of the pustulose like dissepiments of corals like Cystiphylloides.





Saturday, April 18, 2015

Rhipidomella sp. brachiopod from Morocco

I've received some new brachiopod specimens from Morocco recently and this Rhipidomella sp. is one of them. It's a large, rounded shell with fine radial ribbing on the surface. The pedicle valve is a bit more convex than the brachial valve. The specimen comes from El Mrakib near Alnif in Morocco. I don't have specifics as to the formation (I suspect the Taboumakhlouf Formation) but the local rocks in which it was found are Emsian to Givetian in age (Devonian). I have not yet been able to locate any literature which details this genera from Morocco so at this time I cannot give it a species name.

Brachial valve
Anterior
Pedicle valve
Posterior
Profile


Thursday, April 16, 2015

Devonogypa spinulosa brachiopod from Morocco

I've received some new brachiopod specimens from Morocco recently and this Gypidulid is one of them. The shell is about as wide as it is long with very unequal valves. The pedicle valve is very convex and curved while the brachial valve is only slightly convex. There is no sulcus in the shell and it is smooth except for some very fine concentric growth lines. I believe this should be called Devonogypa spinulosa after reading the paper, Middle Devonian brachiopods from the southern Maïder (eastern Anti- Atlas, Morocco). Halamski, A.T. and Baliński, A., 2013. Annales Societatis Geologorum Poloniae, 83: 243–307 since it seems to match both the description and the specimens illustrated in the plates.  Within the paper the authors refer to this species as coming from outcrops of the Taboumakhlouf Formation (Devonian, Eifelian to Givetian stage) on El Mrakib (a mountain near Alnif) and the specimens I received came from there as well.

Brachial valve (note the spirorbis epibiont on the surface)
Anterior
Pedicle valve
Posterior
Profile

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Digonella digona brachiopod from Ranville, France

I've featured the brachiopod Digonella digona on my blog previously, about four years ago, with specimens that came from Luc sur Mer, Calvados Department, France. The specimen below comes from a quarry near Ranville, which is inland and south from Luc sur Mer. The fossil is preserved with a black colored calcite compared to the tan and grey of the other specimens. It also comes from Bathonian aged sediments (Jurassic) and likely the same rock formation. The shell of the species is longer than wide with a flat anterior margin and no evidence of a sulcus. Typical of the Terebratulid order, there is a large, round foramen in the beak of the umbo on the pedicle valve.

Brachial valve
Anterior
Pedicle valve
Posterior
Profile

Thanks to Gery for sending me this fossil!

Sunday, April 12, 2015

Amaltheus sp. ammonite from France

Here is another type of pyritized Ammonite that can be found in the Toarcian aged rocks (Jurassic) around Millau, Aveyron Dept., France. It's labelled as an Amaltheus sp. and is a small fossil. The whorls overlap about 25% of each previous volution. The external ornamentation is preserved well with the strong ribs that do not continue onto the keel. The keel is smooth except for a raised portion that has slight notches regularly space so that it looks like a braid from the side. Not enough of the internal sutures are visible to tell for sure, but this specimen looks very similar to one that I saw on the Steinkern.de forum, in this post, that was identified as Amaltheus margaritatus cf. forma subnodosus.




Thanks to Gery for sending me this fossil!